Intergalactic Bridge Aglow With Billions of New Stars discovered from Herschel Space Observatory

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The Herschel Space Observatory has discovered a giant, galaxy-packed filament ablaze with billions of new stars.
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The filament connects two clusters of galaxies that, along with a third cluster, will smash together and give rise to one of the largest galaxy superclusters in the universe. Herschel is a European Space Agency mission with important NASA contributions. The filament is the first structure of its kind spied in a critical era of cosmic buildup when colossal collections of galaxies called superclusters began to take shape. The glowing galactic bridge offers astronomers a unique opportunity to explore how galaxies evolve and merge to form superclusters. The intergalactic filament, containing hundreds of galaxies, spans 8 million light-years and links two of the three clusters that make up a supercluster known as RCS2319. This emerging supercluster is an exceptionally rare, distant object whose light has taken more than seven billion years to reach us. RCS2319 is the subject of a huge observational study, led by Tracy Webb and her group at McGill. Previous observations in visible and X-ray light had found the cluster cores and hinted at the presence of a filament. It was not until astronomers trained Herschel on the region, however, that the intense star-forming activity in the filament became clear. Dust obscures much of the star-formation activity in the early universe, but telescopes like Herschel can detect the infrared glow of this dust as it is heated by nascent stars. The amount of infrared light suggests that the galaxies in the filament are cranking out the equivalent of about 1,000 solar masses of new stars per year. Researchers chalk up the blistering pace of star formation in the filament to the fact that galaxies within it are being crunched into a relatively small cosmic volume under the force of gravity. By studying the filament, astronomers will be able to explore the fundamental issue of whether “nature” versus “nurture” matters more in the life progression of a galaxy.
source:www.nasa.gov

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