Partial Lunar Eclipse Is Going to Happen on July 16-17

Partial Lunar Eclipse Is Going to Happen on July 16-17

On July 16-17, 2019 it is going to occur partial lunar eclipse which will be visible much of the world. This will be the last time that the moon sweeps through the Earth’s dark umbral shadow until the total lunar eclipse on May 26, 2021.

At this time North America hasn’t an opportunity to watch this eclipse entirely. Partial lunar eclipse will be seen from South America at early evening July 16. So, consequently, in Europe and Africa it will occur later in the evening July 16. From Asia and Australia, it will happen during the morning nighttime hours July 17. From South America, the moon is already in eclipse as it rises around sunset July 16; and in Australia, the moon is in eclipse as it sets around sunrise July 17.

This below photo is a partially eclipsed moon taken by Ken Christison.

Partial Lunar Eclipse Is Going to Happen on July 16-17

According to space.com “The July 2019 full moon travels through the Earth’s outer faint penumbral shadow before and after partially sweeping through the Earth’s inner dark umbral shadow. (See above diagram.) However, the penumbral stage of the eclipse is so faint that many people won’t even notice it, even as it’s taking place. So the eclipse times listed below are for the full moon’s passage through the dark umbra. From start to finish, the umbral phase lasts nearly three hours”.

The lunar eclipse can only happen at full moon, because that’s the only time the moon can be directly opposite of the sun in Earth’s sky.

This time around, however, the alignment of the sun, Earth and full moon is somewhat askew, so it’s a partial lunar eclipse instead of a total lunar eclipse on July 16, 2019.

Partial Lunar Eclipse Is Going to Happen on July 16-17
The moon moves from west to east across the Earth’s shadow. On July 16, 2019, the north side of the full moon clips the southern part of the Earth’s shadow, to stage a partial lunar eclipse on July 16, 2019_image_space.com

Source: Text; Space.com

Image credit; Space.com