Spectacular View of Peculiar Galaxy Centaurus A

The new image shows spectacular new view of a peculiar galaxy Centaurus A, which is a sprawling elliptical galaxy located about 12 million light-years from Earth in the southern constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur). The peculiar galaxy emits strong radio emissions and is the most prominent radio galaxy in the sky, according to officials from the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Centaurus A’s bright nucleus, powerful radio emissions, and jets may be produced by a supermassive central black hole that is 100 million times more massive than the sun, astronomers have said.

Hubble Image Show Spiral Galaxy NGC 4980

This image, which shows NGC 4980, is composed of exposures taken in visible and infrared light by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The image is approximately 3.3 by 1.5 arcminutes in size.NGC 4980 is a spiral galaxy in the southern constellation of Hydra. The shape of NGC 4980 appears slightly deformed, something which is often a sign of recent tidal interactions with another galaxy. In this galaxy’s case, however, this appears not to be the case as there are no other galaxies in its immediate vicinity.

New Observations of Giant Elliptical Galaxy Centaurus A

New Infrared and X-ray observations from two space telescopes strengthen the view that the galaxy may have been created by the cataclysmic collision of two older galaxies. The infrared light was captured by the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory. The X-ray observations were made by the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton space telescope. Centaurus A is the closest giant elliptical galaxy to Earth, at a distance of around 12 million light-years.

Astronomers Found Quasars Acting as Gravitational Lenses

Astronomers by using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope were able to find several examples of galaxies containing quasars, which act as gravitational lenses, amplifying and distorting images of galaxies aligned behind them. Quasars are among the brightest objects in the universe, far outshining the total starlight of their host galaxies. Quasars are powered by supermassive black holes. To find these rare cases of galaxy-quasar combinations acting as lenses, a team of astronomers led by Frederic Courbin at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) selected 23,000 quasar spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).

Feeding of Teenage Galaxies

New observations which was made by using ESO’s Very Large Telescope will help to better understand the growth of teenage galaxies. In the biggest survey of its kind astronomers have found that galaxies changed their eating habits during their teenage years the period from about 3 to 5 billion years after the Big Bang. At the start of this phase smooth gas flow was the preferred snack, but later, galaxies mostly grew by cannibalising other smaller galaxies. Galaxies examined through the VLT are located in a tiny patch of sky more than 40 million light-years away, in the constellation of Cetus.

Recycling of Galaxies May Help Explain Star Formation Mystery

Astronomers have caught a galaxy in the act of recycling material that it previously threw out, which may explain the discrepancy. New observations provide the first direct evidence of gas flowing into distant galaxies that are actively creating baby stars, offering support for the “galactic recycling” theory. Our Milky Way galaxy seems to turn about one solar mass’ worth of matter into new stars every year.

Hubble New Image of Antlia Dwarf Galaxy

The myriad faint stars that comprise the Antlia Dwarf galaxy are more than four million light-years from Earth, but this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image offers such clarity that they could be mistaken for much closer stars in our own Milky Way. This very faint and sparsely populated small galaxy was only discovered in 1997. This image was created from observations in visible and infrared light taken with the Wide Field Channel of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Andromeda Galaxy Exotic X-Ray

According to new study an intensely bright X-ray beacon shining in the Andromeda galaxy is actually a signpost for a hungry black hole that is gobbling up matter at a furious pace.NASA’s Chandra X-ray observatory first discovered the so-called ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in late 2009 in the Andromeda galaxy, which is located about 2.5 million light-years away from our own Milky Way galaxy. Stellar black holes are formed by the collapse of massive stars and typically contain up to 10 or 20 times the mass of the sun. According to the new studies, the black hole causing the ULX object in Andromeda is at least 13 times more massive than our sun and formed after a massive star ended its life in a spectacular supernova explosion.

Subaru Telescope Captures Stealth Merger of Dwarf Galaxies

An international team of scientists led by David Martinez-Delgado (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany) has conducted research that reveals a “stealth merger” of dwarf galaxies, where an in-falling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means yet has a substantial influence on its host galaxy. Researchers used the Subaru Telescope to obtain high-resolution images of individual stars in a dense stream of stars in the outer regions of a nearby dwarf galaxy (NGC 4449), these outlying stars are the remains of an even smaller companion galaxy in the process of merging with its host.

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