Cassie Is a Robot that Walks in a Fashion Like Humans

Cassie Is a Robot that Walks in a Fashion Like Humans

Agility Robotics is officially announcing a new bipedal robot named Cassie․ Cassie is a dynamic bipedal robot that can walk and run in a fashion similar to that of humans or animals. It walks like humans which makes it better at handling the diverse and complex terrain that humans walk over all the time without even thinking.

As mentions spectrum.ieee.org “In addition to search-and-rescue and disaster relief, Agility Robotics has one particular environment and situation in mind: They want Cassie to be scampering up your steps to deliver packages to your front door”.

Below you may watch the video where the Cassie is just 3 months old.

Agility Robotics’ cofounder (and OSU professor) Jonathan Hurst said; “There were many, many unknowns in the design of ATRIAS. ATRIAS was the first machine to demonstrate human-like gait dynamics and implement spring-mass walking [reproducing the ground reaction forces and center-of-mass motion of human walking], but it was not a practical machine for any use other than science demonstration. We learned a few key things with ATRIAS: First, the legs on ATRIAS are configured as a 4-bar linkage, in part to create minimum inertia for the spring-mass model embodiment. However, the configuration results in one motor acting as a brake on the other, with a lot of power cycling internally between motors rather than doing work on the world. After some analysis, we developed the specific leg configuration of Cassie. This allows the motors to be smaller, and the robot to be far more efficient than even ATRIAS was”.

In accordance with agilityrobotics.com the robot is a highly capable, rugged, bipedal research platform in use by numerous customers. With all-day battery life, an open architecture that provides access to low-level controls, and 3 years of included support, Cassie is the world’s best tool for pioneering new applications in bipedal robotics.

Source: Text; spectrum.ieee.org,

Image credit; www.agilityrobotics.com