Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells for The First Time

Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells for The First Time

Robot can do everything that is possible or impossible, now robots grow mini-organs, or “organoids”, as scientists claim, from human stem cells which are used for experimental research for the first time.

An automated system that uses robots has been designed to rapidly produce human mini-organs derived from stem cells said researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The new mini-organs could be utilized for areas such as drug discovery or basic research.

Red, green, and yellow colors show different segments of the kidney
Red, green, and yellow colors show different segments of the kidney

“This is a new “secret weapon” in our fight against disease,” Benjamin Freedman, a medical researcher at the UW Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and the Kidney Research Institute, said in a statement.

Mini-organs, or organoids as scientists call them, could save human’s life someday. Robots are also able to analyze their creations to identify the different types of cells present in the organoids.

“Ordinarily, just setting up an experiment of this magnitude would take a researcher all day, while the robot can do it in 20 minutes,” said Benjamin Freedman a scientist at the University of Washington’s School of Medicine.

“On top of that, the robot doesn’t get tired and make mistakes. There’s no question. For repetitive, tedious tasks like this, robots do a better job than humans,” he added.

It is the first time robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells.

According to IFLScience however, the study didn’t stop there. They then used this incredible new technique to search for drugs that could affect disease. In one of these experiments, they produced organoids with mutations that cause polycystic kidney disease and then exposed them to a number of substances. They discovered that a compound known as blebbistatin led to a significant increase in the number and size of cysts.

At the end Freedman added that that was unexpected and It was definitely a pathway they would be looking at.

Source: newsroom.uw.edu