Bees Stop Buzzing During Solar Eclipses

Bees Stop Buzzing During Solar Eclipses

Researchers have realized a new study that discover bees stop buzzing during the solar eclipses better to say when a solar eclipse reaches darkness. The scientists of the new research are from the University of Missouri.

About the theme of bees stop buzzing  www.cnet.com states “The researchers found that a solar eclipse would trigger similar behavior in bees to how they behave at dusk: flying slower and returning to their colonies at night. This sheds some light on how bees respond to environmental cues that they didn’t expect”.

It is participated approximately 400 members in a new study such as scientists, public and elementary school teachers and students. They helped to set up 16 monitoring stations across Oregon, Idaho and Missouri that were part of the path of totality during the 2017 eclipse.

The results of the data showed that bees are going on to be active in the periods before and after totality, but during totality, they completely stopped flying. [Immediately before and after totality, bee flights tended to be longer in duration. The researchers thought this could be an indication the bees were returning to their nests or that they had reduced flight speed to lower collision risks].

There is no secret that scientists are always interested in the behavior of animals during the solar eclipses. And they also noted earlier observations made on the behavioral responses of seabirds, antelope and cattle.

“The eclipse gave us an opportunity to ask whether the novel environmental context — mid-day, open skies — would alter the bees’ behavioral response to dim light and darkness. As we found, complete darkness elicits the same behavior in bees, regardless of timing or context. And that’s new information about bee cognition,” said Candace Galen, lead researcher on the study.

Galen and her team hope that during the next solar eclipse, which happens on April 8, 2024, will absolutely discover whether bees return home when the “lights go out” at totality.

Source: www.cnet.com