Here Are the Mars Sunset and Sunrise

Here Are the Mars Sunset and Sunrise

Would you like to enjoy the Mars sunset, then continue reading the article. We are pleased to introduce you some images of  Mars sunset realized by NASA.

Initially, NASA’s Viking 1 lander showed us the first time Mars sunset in 1976. Several Red Planet robots have since sent back a different kinds of opinions of Martian sunrises and sunsets, including color-corrected, blue-hued images.

Let’s discover when and which rovers take images of Mars sunset and sunrise.

  1. For first time, as we have mentioned above Viking 1 lander realized the first photo in 1976.
  2. Viking 2 captured the Mars sunrise on June 14, 1978.
  3. NASA’s Spirit Mars rover captured Martian Sun on May 9, 2005.
The Sun sinks below the horizon in this stunning panoramic view captured by NASA's Spirit Mars rover in 2005_image_credit_NASA
The Sun sinks below the horizon in this stunning panoramic view captured by NASA’s Spirit Mars rover in 2005_image_credit_NASA

4. Curiosity Mars rover captured another blue view of the Sun which had become a short move in 2015.

Here is the image of 2015.

Curiosity Mars rover captured
Curiosity Mars rover captured
  1. And nowadays, Insight lander has captured Mars sunset and sunrise in 2019.
Here Are the Mars Sunset and Sunrise
The image was captured at 6:30 p.m. local time on Mars in April 2019_image_credit_NASA

Mars is farther from the Sun than Earth, that is why the Sun appears only about two-thirds the size we see when we watch sunsets here on Earth.

Maybe you think about why Mars planet is red but some images are blue. Here is the answer. As it is famous for us Mars is Red Planet because of iron oxide (like rust) in its soil. The planet’s distinctive reddish hue is visible from Earth even without the aid of a telescope. Just as colors are made more dramatic in sunsets on Earth, Martian sunsets would appear bluish to human observers watching from the red planet.

“The colors come from the fact that the very fine dust is the right size so that blue light penetrates the atmosphere slightly more efficiently,” said Mark Lemmon of Texas A&M University, College Station, a science team member of the Curiosity rover mission. “When the blue light scatters off the dust, it stays closer to the direction of the Sun than light of other colors does. The rest of the sky is yellow to orange, as yellow and red light scatter all over the sky instead of being absorbed or staying close to the Sun.”

 

Martian sunrises and sunsets in 2019
Martian sunrises and sunsets in 2019

Source; Text and Images; NASA