Researchers Have Found Oldest Human Remains in Greece

Researchers Have Found Oldest Human Remains in Greece

The researchers from the University of Tübingen and the University of Athens have found oldest human remains in Greece outside Africa.

According to www.dw.com “More than 200,000 years old, skull fragments found in Greece show Homo sapiens reached Europe from Africa much earlier than previously known. The findings may upend theories about migration from the cradle of humankind”.

Dw.com informed that Apidima 1 — a Homo sapiens skull fragments found in a Greek cave in the 1970s — was estimated to be 210,000 years old. The research team used state-of-the-art computer modeling and uranium dating to identify the fragments’ age.

Skulls fragments from a Neanderthal — a distant cousin of Homo sapiens — were also found in the cave and named Apidima 2. However, it was found to be 40,000 years younger than the Homo sapiens fragment.

“It shows that the early dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa not only occurred earlier, before 200,000 years ago but also reached further geographically, all the way to Europe,” said Katerina Harvati, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Tübingen.

“This is something that we did not suspect before, and which has implications for the population movement of these ancient groups,” she added.

“Our results indicate that an early dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa occurred earlier than previously believed, before 200,000 years ago,” Karvati said. “We’re seeing evidence for human dispersals that are not just limited to one major exodus out of Africa.”

Source: Text; www.dw.com, www.theguardian.com

Image credit; www.dw.com