Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson Three Billionaires in One Place

Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson Three Billionaires in One Place

Three billionaires or better to say three remarkable men have a mission to save Earth first. Elon Musk wants to fly to Mars. Jeff Bezos has a dream putting a colony on the moon. And Richard Branson wants to offer luxury space tourism under the Virgin banner. Christian Davenport, author of “The Space Barons”, in his book writes about these three billionaires, discusses their different ideas for exploring the cosmos, and explains why women are still so underrepresented in space. It is indicated in a statement “it’s no surprise that space enthusiasts would be ecstatic about any seemingly viable alternative to space politics as usual. That said, Bezos and Musk have good reason to crow. Both have successfully launched reusable rockets that may eventually bring down costs enough to revolutionize access to space. But all four ‘barons’ can also be secretive. Bezos, in particular, has a reputation for being extraordinarily careful about what he reveals in public, Davenport notes. So, much so, that it wasn’t until Newsweek reporter Brad Stone found a coffee-stained copy of Bezos’ Blue Origin mission statement in the company trash, that the Amazon founder’s space aspirations became public.” It is stated in the book that Bezos’ new Seattle-based Zefram LLC. was, in fact, inspired by a fictional Star Trek inventor. In Trek lore, “Zefram Cochrane,” Davenport writes, “created the first spaceship capable of traveling at warp speeds, or faster than the speed of light.” Speaking about Musk, he was inspired by the notion that people have to at least get a portion of humanity off this planet for good, perhaps himself included on a one-way trip to the nearest potentially habitable planet, which in his view remains Mars. Richard Branson wasn’t the first to “try to sell the allure of space,” Davenport writes. “During the 1960s, Pan Am started promoting trips to the Moon as a way to cash in” on the surging interest in Apollo. So, Pan Am created a waiting list of potential lunar passengers. Branson has done something similar in presales of tickets for a suborbital flight on Virgin Galactic.