A Billionaire Sends a Probe to Enceladus for Searching Life on There

A Billionaire Sends a Probe to Saturn Moon for Searching Life on There

As innovative technology is growing as humans try to discover the secrets of cosmos. And this time a billionaire Yuri Milner has decided to send a probe to Saturn’s moon Enceladus for discovering the evidence of life there. So that the mission has been realized NASA will help him.

Enceladus is the sixth-largest moon of Saturn. It is about 500 kilometers (310 mi) in diameter, about a tenth of that of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. Enceladus is mostly covered by fresh, clean ice, making it one of the most reflective bodies of the Solar System. Accordingly, its surface temperature at noon only reaches −198 °C (−324 °F), far colder than a light-absorbing body would be. Despite its small size, Enceladus has a wide range of surface features, ranging from old, heavily cratered regions to young, tectonically deformed terrains.

Its surface temperature at noon only reaches −198 °C (−324 °F)
its surface temperature at noon only reaches −198 °C (−324 °F)

Enceladus, however, is very far away and planetary missions are expensive – but there may be an ideal solution.

About this unbelievable mission was first published in New Scientist on November 8, 2018. So the billionaire entrepreneur and physicist Yuri Milner wants to send a private mission back to this fascinating world, and NASA wants to help him.

According to earthsky.org “Agreements signed by NASA and Milner’s non-profit Breakthrough Starshot foundation in September show that the organizations are working on scientific, technical and financial plans for the ambitious mission. NASA has committed over $70,000 to help produce a concept study for a flyby mission. The funds won’t be paid to Breakthrough but represent the agency’s own staffing costs on the project”.

How Does the Idea Come Out?

Enceladus has become a prime target in the search for extraterrestrial life in the solar system, since its subsurface ocean is thought to be quite similar to oceans on Earth, due to data from the Cassini mission, which orbited Saturn from 2004 until September 2017. Scientists already know it is salty and there is evidence for geothermal activity on the ocean floor, similar to “smoker” volcanic vents on the bottom of oceans on Earth.

Scientists already know it is salty and there is evidence for geothermal activity on the ocean floor
Scientists already know it is salty and there is evidence for geothermal activity on the ocean floor

Source: Text; Image Credit: earthsky.org,