Amateur Astronomer Victor Buso managed to Catch a Supernova on Camera

Amateur Astronomer Victor Buso Managed to Catch a Supernova on Camera

This accession has happened very accidently. Amateur Astronomer Victor Buso managed to catch a Supernova on his Camera on September 20, 2016. In Rosario, Argentina he was checking out the new camera on his telescope by taking pictures of a nearby galaxy when a star within it went off in a supernova explosion. “Professional astronomers have long been searching for such an event, said UC Berkeley astronomy professor Alex Filippenko. “It’s like winning the cosmic lottery.” Víctor Buso managed to catch the supernova from his rooftop observatory. Buso’s images are the first to capture the brief “shock breakout” phase of a supernova. “Data from the first moments can tell us the structure of the star just before it explodes, providing clues to how it explodes,” Filippenko indicated.

Amateur Astronomer Victor Buso managed to Catch a Supernova on Camera
Amateur Astronomer Victor Buso managed to Catch a Supernova on Camera

What Is a Supernova and Where Do Supernovas Take Place?
A supernova is the explosion of a star. It is the largest explosion that takes place in space. Supernovas are often seen in other galaxies. But It is difficult to see in our own Milky Way galaxy because dust blocks our view. In 1604, Johannes Kepler discovered the last observed supernova in the Milky Way. NASA’s Chandra telescope discovered the remains of a more recent supernova. It exploded in the Milky Way more than a hundred years ago.
What Causes a Supernova?
A supernova occurs where there is a change in the core, or center, of a star. A change can happen in two different ways, with both resulting in a supernova. The first type of supernova happens in binary star systems. The second type of supernova occurs at the end of a single star’s lifetime.
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Hubble captured the closest supernova explosion in Nearby Galaxy M82  

Source: www.sciencenews.org