Titan-Dunes

Cassini Observes Titan Tropical Dune Fields

A new analysis of radar data from NASA’s Cassini mission, in partnership with the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency, has revealed regional variations among sand dunes on Saturn’s moon Titan. The result gives new clues about the moon’s climatic and geological history. Dune fields are the second most dominant landform on Titan, after the seemingly uniform plains, so they offer a large-scale insight into the moon’s peculiar environment. The dunes cover about 13 percent of the surface, stretching over an area of 4 million square miles (10 million square kilometers). Though similar in shape to the linear dunes found on Earth in Namibia or the Arabian Peninsula, Titan’s dunes are gigantic by our standards. They are on average 0.6 to 1.2 miles (1 to 2 kilometers) wide, hundreds of miles (kilometers) long and around 300 feet (100 meters) high. Their size and spacing vary across the surface, betraying the environment in which they have formed and evolved. Using radar data from the Cassini spacecraft, Alice Le Gall, a former postdoctoral fellow at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., who is currently at the French research laboratory LATMOS, Paris, and collaborators have discovered that the size of Titan’s dunes is controlled by at least two factors: altitude and latitude. The more elevated dunes tend to be thinner and more widely separated. The gaps between the dunes seem to appear to Cassini’s radar, indicating a thinner covering of sand. This suggests that the sand needed to build the dunes is mostly found in the lowlands of Titan. In terms of latitude, the sand dunes on Titan are confined to its equatorial region, in a band between 30 degrees south latitude and 30 degrees north latitude. Dunes tend to be less voluminous toward the north.
source:www.nasa.gov