Researchers discover a Galaxy that Has No Dark Matter

Researchers discover a Galaxy that Has No Dark Matter

A Research team of Yale has detected a galaxy that has no dark matter. As you know dark matter is a type of matter that has not yet been directly observed, but is thought to form a fundamental part of the universe. The discovery has broad implications for astrophysics, the researchers said. It is the first time that dark matter is not always associated with traditional matter on galactic scale. “We thought that every galaxy had dark matter and that dark matter is how a galaxy begins,” said Pieter van Dokkum, Yale’s Sol Goldman Family Professor of Astronomy and lead author of a new study in the journal Nature. “This invisible, mysterious substance is the most dominant aspect of any galaxy,” van Dokkum said. “So finding a galaxy without it is unexpected. It challenges the standard ideas of how we think galaxies work, and it shows that dark matter is real. It has its own separate existence apart from other components of galaxies. This result also suggests that there may be more than one way to form a galaxy.” “It looked like a diffuse blob sprinkled with very compact star clusters,” said co-author Shany Danieli, a Yale graduate student. “I love working with the Dragonfly telescope, as it shows us faint structures that no one has even seen before.” The scientists used the W.M Keck Observatory in Hawaii to size the motions of 10 very dense groupings of stars that is called globular clusters. They discovered that the clusters were going at relatively low speeds which is less than 23,000 miles per hour. In galaxies stars that contains dark matter move as a minimum three times faster. The scientists used NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and Gemini Observatory in Hawaii to discover more features about galaxy. Gemini exposes that the galaxy does not demonstrate signs of an interaction with the other galaxy. Owing to Hubble researchers may identify the globular clusters and measure a correct distance to the galaxy.

Source: NASA

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