A Large Meteorite Crater

A Large Meteorite Crater Was Found Out Under Greenland Ice

In Greenland it was discovered a large meteorite impact crater. An international team of researchers found out this meteorite impact that was hiding beneath more than a half-mile (about 1 km) of ice in northwest Greenland.

According to the data of NASA the large meteorite is one of the 25 largest impact craters on Earth better to say it is the first of any size found under the Greenland ice sheet. To imagine the size of the crater we will bring an example; bigger than Paris or the Beltway around Washington, D.C, measuring 1,000 feet (300 meters) deep and more than 19 miles (30 km) in diameter.

The Hiawatha impact crater is covered by the Greenland Ice Sheet
The Hiawatha impact crater is covered by the Greenland Ice Sheet

According to the study the crater formed less than 3 million years ago, when an iron meteorite more than half a mile (1 km) wide smashed into northwest Greenland. The resulting depression was consequently covered by ice.

Kurt Kjær is a professor at the Center for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and lead author of the study, published November 14, 2018, in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances. Kjær said that the crater’s condition shows the impact might have occurred toward the end of the last ice age, which would place the resulting crater among the youngest on the planet. Kjær said: “The crater is exceptionally well-preserved and that is surprising because glacier ice is an incredibly efficient erosive agent that would have quickly removed traces of the impact”.

The researchers first dotted the crater in July 2015 while they were inspecting a new map of the topography beneath Greenland’s ice sheet.

According to the NASA “Previous radar measurements of Hiawatha Glacier were part of a long-term NASA effort to map Greenland’s changing ice cover,” MacGregor said. “What we really needed to test our hypothesis was a dense and focused radar survey there. The survey exceeded all expectations and imaged the depression in stunning detail: a distinctly circular rim, central uplift, disturbed and undisturbed ice layering, and basal debris — it’s all there.”

Previous radar measurements of Hiawatha Glacier were part of a long-term NASA effort to map Greenland’s changing ice cover
Previous radar measurements of Hiawatha Glacier were part of a long-term NASA effort to map Greenland’s changing ice cover

Source: NASA