Meet the Photos of Mission Apollo 11 - First Humans on the Moon

Meet the Photos of Mission Apollo 11 – First Humans on the Moon

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. It was one of the most-awaited occasion for all the NASA’s team and not only. The first person to step onto the Moon was Neil Armstrong. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC.

Armstrong stayed on the lunar surface for six hours on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later.

They spent about two and a quarter hour together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth.

Command module pilot Michael Collins flew the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon’s surface.

So, Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface at a site they named Tranquility Base before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.

Meet the Photos of Mission Apollo 11
The official emblem of Apollo 11, the United States’ first scheduled lunar landing mission. Photo Credit: NASA
Apollo 11
The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 (Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT), July 16, 1969. Onboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States’ first lunar landing mission. Photo Credit: NASA
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, egresses the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" and begins to descend the steps of the LM ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, egresses the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” and begins to descend the steps of the LM ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon. This photograph was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Photo Credit: NASA
Two members of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission
Two members of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission participate in a simulation of deploying and using lunar tools on the surface of the moon. The rehearsal took place during a training exercise in building 9 on April 22, 1969. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (on left), lunar module pilot, uses a scoop and tongs to pick up samples. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, holds the bag to receive the sample. In the background is a Lunar Module (LM) mock-up. Photo Credit: NASA
A close-up view of a footpad of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module
A close-up view of a footpad of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module as it rested on the surface of the Moon. The stick-like protruding object is a lunar surface sensing probe. This photograph was take with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the extravehicular activity of Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin on July 20, 1969. Photo Credit: NASA
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near a leg of the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near a leg of the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. The astronauts’ bootprints are clearly visible in the foreground. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar orbit. Photo Credit: NASA
This photo is of Edwin Aldrin walking on the lunar surface. Neil Armstrong, who took the photograph
This photo is of Edwin Aldrin walking on the lunar surface. Neil Armstrong, who took the photograph, can be seen reflected in Aldrin’s helmet visor. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface. Photo Credit: NASA

Source: NASA