NASA Called New Moon Lander Project as Artemis

NASA Called New Moon Lander Project as Artemis

For a long time NASA sent men to the moon with program of the name Apollo but this time NASA is working on a new moon lander project named after Artemis. Artemis is the goddess of the moon in Greek mythology.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine discovered the new moniker on Monday (May 13) during a call with reporters that were primarily focused on the budget for the newly named moon program.

“It turns out that Apollo had a twin sister, Artemis. She happens to be the goddess of the moon,” said Bridenstine, referring to Greek mythology. “Our astronaut office is very diverse and highly qualified. I think it is very beautiful that 50 years after Apollo, the Artemis program will carry the next man — and the first woman — to the moon.”

According to space.com the Artemis program, which was previously only referred to by its component names, began when President Donald Trump signed Space Policy Directive 1 in 2017, directing NASA to return astronauts to the moon.

“Two years later, in March 2019, Vice President Mike Pence further defined the program by announcing a five-year deadline for the first crewed lunar landing. The 2024 mission, he said, should land at the south pole with the “first woman and the next man on the moon.”

“As you know, the President has given our agency the bold charge to land the next man and the first woman on the lunar south pole by 2024, and now President Trump has extended his vote of confidence in our work with an amended budget request for fiscal year 2020,” said Bridenstine in a video address to employees. “It includes $1.6 billion in additional funding.”

“Among other things, it will allow us to accelerate our development of the Space Launch System and Orion, it will support the development of a human lunar landing system and it will support precursor capabilities on the lunar surface, including increased robotic exploration of the moon’s polar region,” he said.

Source: Text; space.com

Image credit; space.com