Pulsar PSR J1719-1438 and Diamond in Constellation Serpens

Astronomers discovered alien planet around pulsar PSR J1719-1438, where ultra-high pressures caused carbon to crystallize in the remnant of a dead star. The planet is made of diamond and orbits a dense pulsing star with a radius smaller than that of our sun. It formed from a dead star is a real diamond in the rough. According to new studies the super-high pressure of the planet, which orbits a rapidly pulsing neutron star, has likely caused the carbon within it to crystallize into an actual diamond. The composition of the planet is about five times the size of Earth. The planet’s parent star is a special kind of flashing star known as a millisecond pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star formed from a supernova. 

The entire system, which is only the second of its kind ever discovered, is located about 4,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Serpens or Snake. This particular pulsar PSR J1719-1438 completes more than 10,000 rotations in a minute. Tiny and compact, it’s only about 12 miles (20 kilometers) across, but it has a mass that is 1.4 times that of our sun. PSR J1719-1438 transformed from an average star to a radio pulsar when a dying star in a binary system exploded. The compact core of the star formed with a very high rotation speed from the ashes of the supernova.
source:www.space.com