SpaceX Plans to Build BFR Big Falcon Rocket in Los Angeles

SpaceX Plans to Build BFR Big Falcon Rocket in Los Angeles

SpaceX is going to build its BFR (Big Falcon Rocket) spaceship with a new capacity in Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti declared on April 16. SpaceX’s founder and CEO, Elon Musk, has claimed that the BFR may also send humans to the moon, launch satellites to low Earth orbit, clean up orbital debris and move passengers around Earth at record speeds. Space.com mentioned “The company plans to use this ambitious new vessel, whose acronym name stands for “Big Falcon Rocket” (or a less-family-friendly version of that name) to send people to Mars by 2024 and set up a colony on the Red Planet within the next 50 to 100 years.” “Officially announcing that SpaceX will start production development of the Big Falcon Rocket in the Port of Los Angeles! This vehicle holds the promise of taking humanity deeper into the cosmos than ever before,” Garcetti tweeted after his State of the City address. SpaceX decided to open up a new capacity in the Port of Los Angeles, located roughly 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of the company’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California. According to the space.com documents posted online by Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners, SpaceX’s new site takes up about 18 acres (7.3 hectares) on Terminal Island, a small industrial zone between the San Pedro neighborhood of Los Angeles and the city of Long Beach, California. “SpaceX has called the Port of Los Angeles home to our west coast recovery operations since 2012 and we truly appreciate the City of Los Angeles’ continued partnership,” Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX’s president and chief operating officer, said in a statement. She also added “As announced today by Mayor Garcetti, the Port will play an increasingly important role in our mission to help make humanity multi-planetary as SpaceX begins production development of BFR — our next generation rocket and spaceship system capable of carrying crew and cargo to the moon, Mars and beyond”.

Source: Space.com

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