TESS Mission of NASA Discovered First Star-shredding Black Hole

TESS Mission of NASA Discovered First Star-Shredding Black Hole

NASA’s planet-hunting Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) caught star-shredding black hole for the first time.

 “TESS data let us see exactly when this destructive event, named ASASSN-19bt, started to get brighter, which we’ve never been able to do before,” said Thomas Holoien, a Carnegie Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California. “Because we identified the tidal disruption quickly with the ground-based All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN), we were able to trigger multiwavelength follow-up observations in the first few days. The early data will be incredibly helpful for modeling the physics of these outbursts.”

The study was published in the Sept. 27, 2019, issue of The Astrophysical Journal and is now available online. “The early TESS data allow us to see light very close to the black hole, much closer than we’ve been able to see before,” said Patrick Vallely, a co-author and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow at OSU. “They also show us that ASASSN-19bt’s rise in brightness was very smooth, which helps us tell that the event was a tidal disruption and not another type of outburst, like from the center of a galaxy or a supernova.”

“People have suggested multiple theories — perhaps the light bounces through the newly created debris and loses energy, or maybe the disk forms further from the black hole than we originally thought and the light isn’t so affected by the object’s extreme gravity,” said S. Bradley Cenko, Swift’s principal investigator at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “More early-time observations of these events may help us answer some of these lingering questions.”

Astronomers ponder the supermassive black hole that generated ASASSN-19bt weighs around 6 million times the Sun’s mass. The destroyed star may have been similar in size to our Sun.

Source: Text; NASA

Image credit; NASA