We will Brightest Jupiter in June NASA Informed

This Month Jupiter Will Be Very Close to Earth

This month, Jupiter will be at its biggest and brightest in the night sky. As NASA notes in its monthly “Skywatching Tips,” brightest Jupiter will be up all night, so you don’t have to slip out at a specific time in order to be able to spot the planet.

According to NASA “the solar system’s largest planet is a brilliant jewel to the naked eye, but looks fantastic through binoculars or a small telescope, which will allow you to spot the four largest moons, and maybe even glimpse a hint of the banded clouds that encircle the planet”.

Jupiter reaches opposition on June 10. This is the yearly occurrence when Jupiter, Earth and the Sun are arranged in a straight line, with Earth in the middle.

With a help of Juno spacecraft astronomers can see the brightest Jupiter so close as if you are able to touch it.

Juno is a NASA space probe orbiting the planet Jupiter. It was built by Lockheed Martin and is operated by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on August 5, 2011 (UTC) and entered a polar orbit of Jupiter on July 5, 2016. After completing its mission, Juno will be intentionally deorbited into Jupiter’s atmosphere.

NASA writes “Okay, imagine a line passing through Jupiter and Saturn, like so. This more or less represents the plane in which Earth and the other planets orbit the Sun. Think of it as a big disk, and you’re looking out to the edge of the disk from within it”.

We will Brightest Jupiter in June NASA Informed
the solar system’s largest planet is a brilliant jewel to the naked eye, but looks fantastic through binoculars or a small telescope, which will allow you to spot the four largest moons, and maybe even glimpse a hint of the banded clouds that encircle the planet.

Source: Text; solarsystem.nasa.gov

Image credit; solarsystem.nasa.gov