Expeditors found The Apollo engines from depths of Atlantic Ocean

The team of expeditors led by Bezos found rusted pieces of two Apollo-era rocket engines from the depths of Atlantic ocean. As you know, the Apollo rocket helped the astronauts to fly to the Moon. The expeditors’ team raised the engine parts approximately three weeks, then carried the parts to the launch pad for the lunar missions in Florida. The Bezos team used the sonar equipment for finding the location of sunken engines, which are approximately 3 miles deep in the Atlantic ocean and 360 miles from Cape Canaveral. But there is some unclear fact. The serial numbers on the corroded pieces are missing or it is hard for expeditors to read the numbers. So, the Bezos team can’t know to which Apollo mission the engines belonged.

Glenn Marks 50 Years Since Historic Spaceflight

On February 20, 1962, John Glenn made the United States’ first orbital spaceflight, zipping around our planet three times in his Friendship 7 capsule before splashing down safely in the Atlantic Ocean.The mission put the nation on even footing with the Soviet Union, which had first pulled off the feat in April 1961. As it celebrates the 50th anniversary of Glenn’s historic flight, which helped propel NASA toward unprecedented accomplishments in human spaceflight, the agency lacks the ability to replicate his achievement. Since NASA’s space shuttle fleet retired in July 2011, the U.S. now depends on Russia to transport American astronauts to and from low-Earth orbit. It’s an irony that is not lost on Glenn.

Amasia the Next Supercontinent in North Pole

According to scientists at Yale University America and Eurasia will crash into each other over the North Pole in 50-200 million years time. A supercontinent last formed 300 million years ago, when all the land masses grouped together on the equator as Pangaea, centred about where West Africa is now. After looking at the geology of mountain ranges around the world, geologists had assumed that the next supercontinent would form either in the same place as Pangaea, closing the Atlantic Ocean like an accordion, or on the other side of the world, in the middle of the current Pacific Ocean.