Stephen Hawking Gives Definition What Happened Before the Big Bang

The Big Bang theory is the mysterious question that had been actual before and will be actual in future until the scientists find out the real and precise definition. It is the leading explanation about how the universe began. It is supposed to say the universe as we know started with a small singularity, then inflated over the next 13.8 billion years to the cosmos that we know today. By the way, let’s pass on the deeper question “But what happened before the Big Bang?”. The famous physicist Stephen Hawking gives a definition to this question, which he gave in an interview with his colleague scientist, Neil de Grasse Tyson.

Signal from the First Stars in the Universe

For the first time Scientists detected a signal from stars emerging in the early universe. Researchers discovered that ancient suns were active within 180 million years of the Big Bang with the help of a radio antenna. Astronomers from prestigious institutes made a disclosure with their Experiment to Detect the Global EoR (Epoch of Reionization) Signature (EDGES) project. The head of the investigator on the project Judd Bowman said “Finding this miniscule signal has opened a new window on the early universe”, and added that telescopes could not far enough to directly image such ancient stars, but they had seen when they turned on in radio waves arriving from space.

The Faintest Distant Galaxy

Astronomers have found the faintest galaxy yet seen in the deep, distant reaches of space, an object whose light has taken 13 billion years to reach us. The tiny galaxy, which existed about 800 million years after the Big Bang created the universe, is among the top 10 most distant objects known. According to astronomers this image is like a baby picture of this galaxy, taken when the universe was only 5 percent of its current age.

Oldest and Closest White Dwarfs

Scientists from the University of Oklahoma have identified two white dwarf stars considered the oldest and closest known to man. Astronomers identified these 11- to 12-billion-year-old white dwarf stars only 100 light-years away from Earth. According to scientists these stars are the closest known examples of the oldest stars in the universe forming soon after the Big Bang. Mukremin Kilic, assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the OU College of Arts and Sciences and lead author on a recently published paper said that a white dwarf is like a hot stove, once the stove is off, it cools slowly over time.

An Ancient Planetary System Discovered

Astronomers have discovered a planetary system that formed nearly 13 billion years ago, suggesting the early universe harbored more planets than has been thought. The system consists of a star called HIP 11952 and two Jupiter-like alien planets. It is just 375 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Cetus (the Whale). The planets are likely the oldest yet found, at 12.8 billion years old, they’re just 900 million years younger than the universe itself, according to the commonly accepted Big Bang theory. HIP 11952 contains very little other than hydrogen and helium.

New Theory About Why Black Holes Become so Hugely Massive

The team of researchers from the University of Leicester (UK) and Monash University in Australia investigated how some black holes grow so fast that they are billions of times heavier than the sun. Professor Andrew King from the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, said that almost every galaxy has an enormously massive black hole in its center. Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, has one about four million times heavier than the sun.

Feeding of Teenage Galaxies

New observations which was made by using ESO’s Very Large Telescope will help to better understand the growth of teenage galaxies. In the biggest survey of its kind astronomers have found that galaxies changed their eating habits during their teenage years the period from about 3 to 5 billion years after the Big Bang. At the start of this phase smooth gas flow was the preferred snack, but later, galaxies mostly grew by cannibalising other smaller galaxies. Galaxies examined through the VLT are located in a tiny patch of sky more than 40 million light-years away, in the constellation of Cetus.

New Study Suggests that Universe Expanded Rapidly

A new study found that cosmic inflation, which was first proposed in 1980, is the simplest explanation that fits the measurements of the distribution of matter throughout the universe made by NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), a spacecraft that scans radiation left over from the Big Bang. According to inflation, the universe expanded by a factor of at least 1078 (that’s 10 with 78 zeroes after it), all in less than a second.

Planck Show Molecular Gas and Three Molecular Cloud Complexes

New images from the Planck mission show previously undiscovered islands of star formation and a mysterious haze of microwave emissions in our Milky Way galaxy. The views give scientists new treasures to mine and take them closer to understanding the secrets of our galaxy. Planck is a European Space Agency mission with significant NASA participation. The new images show the entire sky, dominated by the murky band of our Milky Way galaxy. One of them shows the unexplained haze of microwave light previously hinted at in measurements by NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP).

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