Chandra space telescope pictured exoplanets in a X-ray

For the first time from the moment of opening of the first extra solar planets scientists could see such planet by supervision in the x-ray range with help of Chandra space telescope and the European XMM Newton. The majority known exoplanets (which number at present exceeds 900) opened with help of a so-called transit method — by fixing of small fluctuations of brightness of stars when passing planet against a star disk. Still supervision was conducted only in the optical range, but now scientists managed to see x-ray transit. Thousand candidate exoplanets were found thanks to transits in visible light. At last, the scientists could see one in a X-ray, which is important as gives new information on properties of exoplanets.

Giant Black Hole Squashes Star Formation

The Herschel Space Observatory has shown galaxies with the most powerful, active black holes at their cores produce fewer stars than galaxies with less active black holes. The results are the first to demonstrate black holes suppressed galactic star formation when the universe was less than half its current age. Herschel is a European Space Agency-led mission with important NASA contributions. Supermassive black holes, weighing as much as millions of suns, are believed to reside in the hearts of all large galaxies.

Monster Black Hole Swallows Unlucky Star

For the first time, astronomers have identified a stellar victim of a giant black hole, an unlucky star whose death may ultimately provide more clues on the inner workings of the enigmatic gravitational monster that devoured it. Supermassive black holes are objects millions to billions times the sun’s mass that lurk in the hearts of most galaxies. They lay quietly until victims, such as stars, wander close enough to get shredded apart by their extraordinarily powerful gravitational pull.

Remarkable Outburst From Old Black Hole

The discovery, made by astronomers using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, provides new insight into the nature of a mysterious class of black holes that can produce as much energy in X-rays as a million suns radiate at all wavelengths. Researchers used Chandra to discover a new ultraluminous X-ray source, or ULX. These objects give off more X-rays than most binary systems, in which a companion star orbits the remains of a collapsed star.