Unusual Galaxy Photographed from Gemini Observatory

Astronomers from Observatory “Gemini” received the most detailed to date image of the unusual galaxy NGC 660, relating to a rare class of polar galaxies. The galaxy NGC 660 is located at a distance of 40 million light years from Earth near the constellation Pisces. It is as if two separate star clusters: the spiral and lenticular. Such galaxies are called polar – they rotate the outer ring over the poles of the internal cluster. In addition, NGC 660 is the only other known polar galaxies in which the center has an old lenticular congestion. All polar galaxies are a result of the interaction of two separate star clusters. Some of them can be formed by the collision of two galaxies formed (for example, a galaxy can be formed by a merger in the future, with the Milky Way Andromeda).

Intergalactic Bridge Aglow With Billions of New Stars discovered from Herschel Space Observatory

The Herschel Space Observatory has discovered a giant, galaxy-packed filament ablaze with billions of new stars. The filament connects two clusters of galaxies that, along with a third cluster, will smash together and give rise to one of the largest galaxy superclusters in the universe. Herschel is a European Space Agency mission with important NASA contributions. The filament is the first structure of its kind spied in a critical era of cosmic buildup when colossal collections of galaxies called superclusters began to take shape.

Comet Garradd Sails Slowly Past Globular Star Cluster M92

Skywatcher Bill Snyder took this marvelous photo on February 3, 2012 from Heavens Mirror Observatory in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Comet Garradd sails slowly past globular star cluster Messier 92 (also known as M92 or NGC 6341) in this stunning image. The comet approached Messier 92 (M92) as it flew over the Hercules constellation. It passed within half a degree of Messier 92 (M92) on the day the image was taken.

Messier 9 Shines in Hubble’s New Photo

The globular cluster, called Messier 9, shines in this new photo from the Hubble Space Telescope.The cluster Messier 9 contains hordes of stars swarming in a spherical cloud about 25,000 light-years from Earth. The object is too faint to be seen with the naked eye, and when it was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier in 1764, the scientist could only resolve it as a faint smudge that he classified as a nebula. Hubble Space Telescope released a new picture of Messier 9 on March 16.

Astronomers Map Distribution of Dark Matter in Abell 383

Two teams of astronomers have used data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes to map the distribution of dark matter in a galaxy cluster known as Abell 383.Abell 383 is located about 2.3 billion light years from Earth. Researchers also able to determine how the dark matter is distributed along the line of sight. The recent work on Abell 383 provides one of the most detailed 3-D pictures yet taken of dark matter in a galaxy cluster. The X-ray data (purple) from Chandra in the composite image show the hot gas, which is by far the dominant type of normal matter in the cluster.

APEX Telescope Reveals Distant Galaxies Undergoing Most Intense Type of Star Formation

Astronomers have combined observations from the LABOCA camera on the ESO-operated 12-meter Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope with measurements made with ESO’s Very Large Telescope, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, and others, to look at the way that bright, distant galaxies are gathered together in groups or clusters. The more closely the galaxies are clustered, the more massive are their halos of dark matter, the invisible material that makes up the vast majority of a galaxy’s mass. The new results are the most accurate clustering measurements ever made for this type of galaxy.

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