Underground metal detectors recorded dark matter

Underground metal detectors of experiment of CDMS II recorded three events,which can testify to interaction with particles of a dark matter. According to the physicists, three events, underground metal detectors reminding interaction with particles of a dark matter, strongly differ from noise. The probability of that these events are a detector signal, instead of its background, makes 99,81 percent – such statistical importance of the phenomenon makes three sigma. In physics the elementary particles significant it is considered to be an event with a confidential interval in five sigma. For example, scientists declared achievement of such importance at candidate particle detection for a role of a boson of Higgs. The scientists consider that there is not enough information but they deserve further recheck. Besides, data impose new restrictions on weight and energy of theoretically predicted particles. Earlier participants of experiment of CDMS II already reported about fixing of two similar events, however their statistical importance was insufficient for an exception of influence of noise. DMS II is one of several experiments directed on detection of theoretically predicted particles of a dark matter.

Dark Matter Theories Challenged By Galaxy Structures

According to astronomers at the University of Bonn in Germany, who made the discovery, the structure of satellite galaxies and star clusters around the Milky Way is so vast that it reaches across a million light-years 10 times as wide as the Milky Way itself. Existing dark matter theories fail to explain the arrangement of these cosmic objects. As said study team member Pavel Kroupa, a professor of astronomy at the University of Bon their model appears to rule out the presence of dark matter in the universe, threatening a central pillar of current cosmological theory.

Dark Matter May Collide With Atoms Inside Human

Invisible dark matter particles may regularly pass through our bodies, and dozens to thousands of these particles may be colliding with atoms inside us every year, according to a new calculation. However, radiation from these impacts is unlikely to cause cancer. Dark matter is one of the greatest scientific mysteries of our time, an invisible substance thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists think it might be composed of things called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, that interact normally with gravity but very weakly with all the other known forces of the universe.

Missing Dark Matter

Dark matter is one of the greatest cosmic mysteries of our time, an invisible, intangible material thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists currently think it is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts normally with gravity but only very weakly with all the other known forces of the universe. As such, dark matter is detectable only via the gravitational pull it generates.

Astronomers Map Distribution of Dark Matter in Abell 383

Two teams of astronomers have used data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes to map the distribution of dark matter in a galaxy cluster known as Abell 383.Abell 383 is located about 2.3 billion light years from Earth. Researchers also able to determine how the dark matter is distributed along the line of sight. The recent work on Abell 383 provides one of the most detailed 3-D pictures yet taken of dark matter in a galaxy cluster. The X-ray data (purple) from Chandra in the composite image show the hot gas, which is by far the dominant type of normal matter in the cluster.

The Dark Matter Core Defies Explanation in Hubble Image

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Telescope have observed what appears to be a clump of dark matter left behind from a wreck between massive clusters of galaxies. The result could challenge current theories about dark matter that predict galaxies should be anchored to the invisible substance even during the shock of a collision. Abell 520 is a gigantic merger of galaxy clusters located 2.4 billion light-years away.

Dark Matter Extends from Galaxies far Into Intergalactic Space

A group of Japanese physicists has revealed where dark matter is for the first time. As it turns out, the mysterious substance is almost everywhere, drooping throughout intergalactic space to form an all-encompassing web of matter. Dark matter is invisible, It doesn’t interact with light, because of that astronomers cannot actually see it. So far, it has only been observed indirectly by way of the gravitational force it exerts on ordinary, visible matter. On the basis of this gravitational interaction, physicists have inferred that dark matter constitutes 22 percent of the matter-energy content of the universe, while ordinary detectable matter constitutes just 4.5 percent.

APEX Telescope Reveals Distant Galaxies Undergoing Most Intense Type of Star Formation

Astronomers have combined observations from the LABOCA camera on the ESO-operated 12-meter Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope with measurements made with ESO’s Very Large Telescope, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, and others, to look at the way that bright, distant galaxies are gathered together in groups or clusters. The more closely the galaxies are clustered, the more massive are their halos of dark matter, the invisible material that makes up the vast majority of a galaxy’s mass. The new results are the most accurate clustering measurements ever made for this type of galaxy.

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