Comet ISON 2013 is the reason of new meteor shower

By the word of scientists, the coming nearer comet, which can quite appear “A comet of a century”, can create an unusual type of a meteor shower. When the comet of ISON 2013 will fly by Earth this year, it is quite possible that the dust from a tail of a comet will create a meteoric stream. In that moment to the atmosphere of a planet will get a stream of the smallest particles, which once were part of a tail of a comet. According to the Paul Veygert instead of combustion in light flash, they will softly drift down to the Earth. By the Veygert’s computer model motes will travel with a speed of 125 000 miles/h (201 168 km/h) but as soon as they will get to Earth atmosphere, will be slowed down before total loss of speed. Because of it, observers on the Earth won’t be able to see meteors as they fall through the atmosphere in January 2014, the scientist added. The invisible meteor shower of a comet dust, if it really occurs, will be very slow. It can take months or even years for the fine dust settling from an upper atmosphere. But the hope of brilliant show can’t be lost.

Lyrid Meteor Shower Will Reach Maximum Intensity This Week

The Lyrids are a strong meteor shower lasting from April 16 to April 26 each year. The Lyrid meteor shower is expected to reach maximum intensity overnight from Saturday to Sunday (April 21 to 22), with the best observing opportunities coming between midnight and dawn on the 22nd local time, experts say. The moon will be nearly new at that time, so its glare shouldn’t drown out too many of the Lyrids’ brief flashes. The dark skies could make a big difference for meteor-watchers, because the Lyrids are historically a mild shower.

Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Overnight from April 21 to April 22

The Lyrids are a strong meteor shower lasting from April 16 to April 26 each year. The radiant of the meteor shower is located in the constellation Lyra, peaking at April 22, hence they are also called the Alpha Lyrids or April Lyrids. According to experts the Lyrid meteor shower peaks overnight from April 21 to April 22, with the best observing coming between midnight and dawn on the 22nd local time. The moon will be new at this time, so the Lyrids’ bright flashes won’t be drowned out by the glare of Earth’s nearest neighbor.

Jupiter Gravity and Meteor Shower from Halley’s Comet

According to new study Jupiter’s powerful gravity can help supercharge a meteor shower caused by trailing chunks of the famed Halley’s comet. Every October, skywatchers are treated to a dazzling show when the Orionid meteors, leftover bits of Halley’s comet, which zips by Earth every 76 years or so, burn up in our atmosphere. The Orionids are incredibly active from time to time, and this activity is generated by a complex orbital interplay among Jupiter, the comet and the meteoroids.

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