Meteorite from Mars

Meteorite from Mars contains Building Block of Life

For the first time astronomers found a large amount of the pine forest, which salts could play a key role in emergence of RNA, which is the connection crucial for emergence of life in a meteorite from Mars. James Stephenson from Institute of astrobiology of NASA at the Hawaiian university in Manoa (USA) and his colleagues investigated the meteorite from Mars found in Antarctica during expedition of 2009-2010. Using an ionic microprobe, scientists analyzed clay streaks in a meteorite from Mars and found out that pine forest in it contains in quantity of 160 parts on one million. That is in eight times more, than in other known meteorites from Mars. Salts of pine forest could play an important role in life origin on Earth as they stabilize a ribose, the RNA important component which was “data carrier” before emergence of life. Molecules of RNA stored and transferred hereditary information between the first live organisms even before emergence of DNA. But thus RNA had to appear during chemical evolution in the lifeless nature.

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Regeneration Muscle Tissue after Heart Attack

Duke University Medical Center scientists have discovered a way to turn the scar tissue that forms after cardiac arrest into healthy muscle tissue, which would make a stem cell transplant unnecessary. To achieve this, Duke University Medical Center scientists introduced microRNA to scar tissue cells in a living mouse. These hardened cells, called fibroblasts, develop as a result of a heart attack (Myocardial infarction (MI) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI)), and impede the organ’s ability to pump blood.

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