Why Do Stars Twinkle, but Planets Don’t? Interesting Facts You Force to Know

Why Do Stars Twinkle, but Planets Don’t? Interesting Facts You Force to Know

Have you ever thought about why do stars twinkle, but planets don’t? This question has a very simple answer that maybe we know, or not. The answer is that on a clear, dark night, our eyes can see about 6,000 or so stars in the sky. They seem to twinkle, or change their brightness, all the time. In fact, most of the stars are shining with a steady light.

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Cosmic Rays Have Left Scientists in Dark

Cosmic rays are charged subatomic particles that streak to Earth from deep in outer space. A few rare cosmic rays are extraordinarily powerful, with energies up to 100 million times greater than any attained by human-made particle colliders, such as CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. The sources of these cosmic rays are a mystery. According to study co-author Francis Halzen at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, principal investigator at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a massive telescope designed to find the tiny subatomic particles nature is capable of accelerating elementary particles to macroscopic energies.

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Star May be Responsible for Newly Discoverd Supernova

Astronomers have identified the star that may be responsible for a supernova discovered by skywatchers last week. The supernova popped up in the galaxy M95 about 33 million light-years from Earth. It was first reported last week by a several different observers and soon confirmed by major observatories. Now a team led by Nancy Elias-Rosa of Spain’s Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia has compared new photos of the exploded star with pictures taken before the supernova occurred to identify what could very well have been the culprit star.

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NASA Delays Launch of NuSTAR

The launch of NASA’s next science mission, a spacecraft to study black holes and other high-energy enigmas of the universe, has been officially delayed. This instrument ,called NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array), is an X-ray space observatory that will study the universe through the shortest wavelength, highest-frequency range of light. The spacecraft is designed to collect data with greater sensitivity and clarity than any X-ray mission before. As reported Nasa the mission will advance our understanding of how structures in the universe form and evolve.

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RXCaptures Thermonuclear Behavior of Unique Neutron Star

In October 2010, a neutron star near the center of our galaxy erupted with hundreds of X-ray bursts that were powered by a barrage of thermonuclear explosions on the star’s surface. On October 10, 2010, the European Space Agency’s INTEGRAL satellite detected a transient X-ray source in the direction of Terzan 5, a globular star cluster about 25,000 light-years away toward the constellation Sagittarius. The object, dubbed IGR J17480–2446, is classed as a low-mass X-ray binary system, in which the neutron star orbits a star much like the sun and draws a stream of matter from it.

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