Why Do Stars Twinkle, but Planets Don’t? Interesting Facts You Force to Know

Why Do Stars Twinkle, but Planets Don’t? Interesting Facts You Force to Know

Have you ever thought about why do stars twinkle, but planets don’t? This question has a very simple answer that maybe we know, or not. The answer is that on a clear, dark night, our eyes can see about 6,000 or so stars in the sky. They seem to twinkle, or change their brightness, all the time. In fact, most of the stars are shining with a steady light.

View More Why Do Stars Twinkle, but Planets Don’t? Interesting Facts You Force to Know
Collision of Uranus Could Explain Two Other Oddities About Tilted Planet

Collision of Uranus Could Explain Two Other Oddities About Tilted Planet

A new study has found out that the collision of Uranus could have led to the planet’s extreme tilt and other odd attributes. [Uranus is so weird because of a massive collision billions of years ago]. “All of the planets in the solar system are spinning more or less in the same way … yet Uranus is completely on its side,” Jacob Kegerreis, the new study’s lead author and a researcher at Durham University’s Institute for Computational Cosmology in the U.K., says.

View More Collision of Uranus Could Explain Two Other Oddities About Tilted Planet
What If Other Planets Were as Close as the Moon?

What If Other Planets Were as Close as the Moon?

Have you ever thought about to see one of the 8 planets instead of Moon? In this creative video you can imagine how big the planets are in our Solar System. The Moon’s average orbital distance is 384,402 km (238,856 mi), or 1.28 light-seconds. This is about thirty times the diameter of Earth. The satellite’s apparent size in the sky is almost the same as that of the Sun (because it is 400x farther and larger).

View More What If Other Planets Were as Close as the Moon?
Scientists Reveal the Sound of Space That Is Really Terrifying

Scientists Reveal the Sound of Space That Is Really Terrifying

The sound of space is truly strange. The sound of Earth! “It’s called chorus,” explains Craig Kletzing of the University of Iowa.  “This is one of the clearest examples we’ve ever heard”. The Researcher explains the sound of Earth. “This is what the radiation belts would sound like to a human being if we had radio antennas for ears,” says Kletzing, whose team at the University of Iowa built the “EMFISIS” (Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science) receiver used to pick up the signals.

View More Scientists Reveal the Sound of Space That Is Really Terrifying
Ceres Was the First Asteroid to Be Discovered

Ceres Was the First Asteroid to Be Discovered

Ceres is considered as the first asteroid that was discovered in 1801. It is sometimes assumed that Ceres has been reclassified as a dwarf planet, and that it is therefore no longer considered an asteroid. For example, a news update at Space.com spoke of “Pallas, the largest asteroid, and Ceres, the dwarf planet formerly classified as an asteroid”, whereas an IAU question-and-answer posting states, “Ceres is the largest asteroid”. So, according at the point of view of Space.com Ceres is a dwarf planet that is considered as the smallest and closest one.

View More Ceres Was the First Asteroid to Be Discovered