Meteor Storm Caused Migration of Planets

According to a new study, huge gas planets’ migration created the meteor storm, which is the biggest in our solar system’s history.
Our solar system was formed 3.9 billion years ago, which was the result of cosmic tempest. There was a migration of planets, in which the Jupiter and Saturn moved closer to the Sun, but the Neptune and Uranus moved further.
The gravitational effects formed by their migrations. The amount meteors were flung towards the solar system, where they clashed with the terrestrial planets, including the Moon and the Earth.

Habitable Exoplanets Catalog

Scientists published habitable exoplanets catalog to list all the known planets in the galaxy that could potentially be habitable to life. The count is at seven so far, with many more to come, researchers said. When it was first released last year, it had two potential habitable planets. According to lead researcher Abel Mendez director of the University of Puerto Rico the team expected to add maybe one or two more in the catalog’s first year. The addition of five suspected new planets was wholly beyond anyone’s expectations. Mendez also said scientists are getting smarter about finding exoplanets, and the pace of discovery is increasing. The team expects to add new models in the coming year, which will affect the measurements on objects already in the catalog.

Habitable Planets Around Red Dwarf Stars

According to a recent study, tens of billions of planets around red dwarfs are likely capable of containing liquid water, dramatically increasing the potential to find signs of life somewhere other than Earth. Red dwarfs are stars that are fainter, cooler and less massive than the sun. These stars, which typically also live longer than Class G stars like the sun, are thought to make up about 80 percent of the stars in the Milky Way, astronomers have said.

An Ancient Planetary System Discovered

Astronomers have discovered a planetary system that formed nearly 13 billion years ago, suggesting the early universe harbored more planets than has been thought. The system consists of a star called HIP 11952 and two Jupiter-like alien planets. It is just 375 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Cetus (the Whale). The planets are likely the oldest yet found, at 12.8 billion years old, they’re just 900 million years younger than the universe itself, according to the commonly accepted Big Bang theory. HIP 11952 contains very little other than hydrogen and helium.

Runaway Planets Travel Through Interstellar Space

New study finds that planets in tight orbits around stars that get ejected from our galaxy may actually themselves be tossed out of the Milky Way at blisteringly fast speeds of up to 30 million miles per hour, or a fraction of the speed of light. As said Avi Loeb, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. these warp-speed planets would be some of the fastest objects in the galaxy, aside from photons and particles like cosmic rays.

Mercury’s Strange Innards

According to new studies the small, sun-scorched planet Mercury has an interior unlike that of any other rocky planet in our solar system and a surprisingly dynamic history. Using observations from NASA’s Messenger spacecraft in orbit around Mercury, researchers have found that the planet’s huge iron core is even larger than they had thought, and it’s likely overlain with a solid shell of iron and sulfur, a layered structure not known to exist on Earth, Venus or Mars.

Plausible Explanation for the Pileups of Giant Planets

Some zones encircling baby stars are far more popular than others, drawing crowds of giant planets while the other potential paths for orbits remain empty. Now computer simulations have revealed a plausible explanation of this phenomenon. Rather than occupying orbits at regular distances from a star, giant gas planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn appear to prefer to occupy certain regions in mature solar systems while staying clear of others.

Antarctica Lake Vostok Will Help Explore Europe

After more than a decade of drilling, Russian scientists broke through the ice on February 5, reaching a hidden cache of water known as Lake Vostok that has been cut off from the surface since an ice sheet covered it between 14 million and 34 million years ago. The isolated lake bears similarities to features on Europa, whose icy surface is thought to hide a liquid ocean layer. Roughly the size of Lake Ontario, the liquid Lake Vostok lies beneath 2 miles (3.7 kilometers) of ice. Its chilly depths could mirror the oceans of Europa, whose icy surface is up to 10 miles (15 km) thick.

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