WISE Finds Brown Dwarfs Close To Solar System

NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, has been turning up a new crowd of stars close to solar system, the coldest of the brown dwarf family of failed stars. As said Davy Kirkpatrick of the WISE science team at NASA’s Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena this is a really illuminating result. Now that they are finally seeing the solar neighborhood with keener, infrared vision, the little guys aren’t as prevalent as they once thought.

Collision Between Milky Way Galaxy and Andromeda Galaxy

Four billion years from now, the Milky Way galaxy as we know it will cease to exist. Our Milky Way is bound for a head-on collision with the similar-sized Andromeda galaxy, researchers announced on May 31. Over time, the huge galactic smashup will create an entirely new hybrid galaxy, one likely bearing an elliptical shape rather than the Milky Way’s trademark spiral-armed disk. Astronomers have long known that the Milky Way and Andromeda, which is also known as M31, are barrelling toward one another at a speed of about 250,000 mph (400,000 kph).

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids

Observations from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) have led to the best assessment yet of our solar system’s population of potentially hazardous asteroids. The results reveal new information about their total numbers, origins and the possible dangers they may pose. Potentially hazardous asteroids, or PHAs, are a subset of the larger group of near-Earth asteroids. The PHAs have the closest orbits to Earth’s, coming within five million miles (about eight million kilometers), and they are big enough to survive passing through Earth’s atmosphere and cause damage on a regional, or greater, scale.

Alien Solar Systems Unlikely Homes for Earth-Like Planets

As said alien solar systems that are home to so-called Hot Jupiters are unlikely homes for Earth-like planets. Hot Jupiters get their name from the fact that they are approximately Jupiter’s size, but extraordinarily near their stars, at about a tenth of the distance from Mercury to our sun. These roaster planets are among the alien worlds that astronomers have discovered most often since their size and proximity to their parent stars mean they exert large gravitational tugs on their hosts that scientists can readily spot.

Alien Planets Eaten by White Dwarf Stars

Astronomers have caught four dying stars in the act of chowing down on rocky alien planets similar to Earth, a destructive cosmic process that may one day play out in our very own solar system. Evidence of the distant celestial meals was found around four white dwarfs, stars that are in the final stages of their lives. According to astrophysicists at the University of Warwick in the U.K. the stars are surrounded by dust and rocky debris from shattered alien planets that appear to have once shared very similar compositions to Earth.

WISE Catches Aging Star Erupting With Dust

Astronomers by using images from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) reveal an old star in the throes of a fiery outburst, spraying the cosmos with dust. The findings offer a rare, real-time look at the process by which stars like our sun seed the universe with building blocks for other stars, planets and even life. The star, catalogued as WISE J180956.27-330500.2, was discovered in images taken during the WISE survey in 2010, the most detailed infrared survey to date of the entire celestial sky.

Volcanic Secrets of Red Planet

As said researchers Giant coils of lava on Mars suggest a mysterious network of valleys on the planet was born from volcanoes. The origin of the Athabasca Valles region near the equator of Mars has been debated for more than a decade. Some researchers have proposed that lava once shaped the valleys, while others have thought ice was responsible. The way the ground there is patterned with multisided polygons suggests that either fire or ice could be the culprit, such patterns of cracks might have formed due to seasonal fluctuations in temperature if the surface there was rich in ice, but also might have arose as lava cooled and fractured.

Rogue Alien Planets

According to study many wandering alien worlds, which were ejected from the solar systems in which they formed, likely find new homes with different suns. The finding could explain why some alien planets orbit extremely far from their stars.Study lead author Hagai Perets, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and co-author Thijs Kouwenhoven of China’s Peking University simulated the evolution of young star clusters containing about as many free-floating planets as stars.

Hubble Captured Globular Cluster Messier 70

NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the brilliance of the compact center of Messier 70, a globular cluster. This picture was obtained with the Wide Field Camera of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The field of view is around 3.3 by 3.3 arcminutes. Quarters are always tight in globular clusters, where the mutual hold of gravity binds together hundreds of thousands of stars in a small region of space. Messier 70 has undergone what is known as a core collapse.

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