NASA opened solar observatory with Iris device for studying the Sun

On Thursday from air base Vandenberg in California was started the rocket Pegasus XL with specialized solar observatory of IRIS device onboard. The satellite intended for research of processes in the atmosphere of the Sun, is successfully put to settlement orbit. The IRIS device is calculated on two years of active work. In the next month it will pass flight tests then scientists will start to work. The ultra-violet telescope established onboard with a 20-centimetric mirror will allow in combination with the new spectrograph and the camera to receive earlier inaccessible information on the Sun atmosphere. The satellite is made counting upon detailed research of the photosphere, the chromospheres and so-called transitional layer.

February 21 Partial Solar Eclipse

A NASA spacecraft has captured stunning footage of on February 21 partial solar eclipse, which left our star looking briefly like a huge celestial Pac-Man. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) snapped a video and photos of the solar eclipse from its lofty perch 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) above Earth. The partial solar eclipse provided more than just pretty pictures, however. During its travels, the moon briefly blocked sunspot AR1422, an active region that is blasting strong ultraviolet emissions into space. According to researchers this caused a dip in the EVE (extreme ultraviolet) output and may allow scientists to calibrate the energy emitted by the active region.

Suns Powerful Eruption

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft viewed Coronal mass ejection on June 7, 2011. This event registered as a Class M-2 solar flare, which is a medium-class sun storm that should not be a danger to satellites or infrastructure on Earth.The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the flare’s peak at 1:41a.m