Enormous Gallinipper Mosquitoes Are 20 Times Larger Than Others

Enormous Gallinipper Mosquitoes Are 20 Times Larger Than Others

Do you meet these type of large mosquitos,called gallinipper mosquitoes (or Psorophora ciliata)? Yes, they exist, and today’s article is devoted to them. Some days ago, Cassie Vadovsky, a local resident from North Carolina has met a terrible situation better to say she greeted enormous mosquitoes known as Psorophora ciliate. “It was like a flurry — like it was snowing mosquitos,” she said. “I think my car agitated them. I waited for them to calm down before I grabbed the kids and the ran into the house.”

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Why World's Oldest Spider Has Died?

Why World’s Oldest Spider Has Died?

World’s oldest spider Trapdoor has died at the age of 43. The 43-year-old female Giaus Villosus the oldest spider trapdoor was known as “Number 16”. Trapdoor Spiders have a long life span, between 5 to 20 years, but this one lived 43 years, and it is considered the world’s oldest spider. So according to researchers the spider did not die of old age but was killed by a wasp sting.

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Spider webs

Spider webs use electricity to catch insects

According to scientific results, a spider webs and positively loaded subjects, such as insects flying by, attract each other. After all, moving wings of insects not simply hold the owners in air, they develop electricity. Bees can develop electric charges up to 200 volts, which is quite enough to separate pollen from flower stamens. Within the research Victor Manuel Ortega-Jimenez and Robert Dudley studied sensitivity of a spider webs to electrostatic charges of insects and water drops. In a basis of this work was defined earlier research as a result of which was necessary extent of deformation of a web from hit of victims in it. We know that for victim capture the spider webs is capable to change the form. But how? The researchers collected all web in the territory of a university campus in Berkeley. Scientists carried out a series of experiments to check reaction of a web to subjects flying by, more exact – a drop of water. As scientists noted, the threads of a web located radically and especially on a spirals, were quickly attracted to the electrified bodies. In check experiments in which were used insects and drop of water without electric charges, it was not observed such change of a form of a web.

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