Spitzer space telescope photographed C/2012 S1 comet before approach with the Sun

Spitzer space telescope transferred pictures of a C/2012 S1 comet of ISON. It becomes the brightest object in the night sky of Earth after the Moon in November, 2013 when it will dive into the Sun to Earth and will take place in dangerous proximity from the star photosphere. The comet of C/2012 S1 comet was open in September, 2012 by the Russian astronomers. The comet in November, 2013 will pass at distance in 1,2 million kilometers from the Sun. At this time brightness of a comet can reach brightness of the full Moon, and it, probably, becomes the brightest in a decade. In December the comet will pass at the minimum distance from Earth, which is about 0,4 radiuses of a terrestrial orbit. Currently the comet is at distance in 3,3 astronomical from the Sun, between orbits of Jupiter and Mars. While it remains invisible to a naked eye, however land and orbital telescopes watch long ago it in the optical and infrared range.

Space Telescope Spitzer Reveal Hidden Light Patterns

NASA believes it’s spotted the dappled light of the first objects in the universe with the best precision yet. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists have observed a lumpy infrared glow that could be coming from wildly massive stars or voracious black holes. The observations help confirm the first objects were numerous in quantity and furiously burned cosmic fuel. As said Alexander Kashlinsky of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center these objects would have been tremendously bright.

Asteroid 1999 RQ36 Nudged by Sunlight

Scientists on NASA’s asteroid sample return mission, Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx), have measured the orbit of their destination asteroid, 1999 RQ36, with such accuracy they were able to directly measure the drift resulting from a subtle but important force called the Yarkovsky effect the slight push created when the asteroid absorbs sunlight and re-emits that energy as heat.

Alien Super Earth Light

NASA’s infrared Spitzer Space Telescope spotted light from the alien planet 55 Cancri e, which orbits a star 41 light-years from Earth. A year on the extrasolar planet lasts just 18 hours. The planet 55 Cancri e was first discovered in 2004 and is not a habitable world. Instead, it is known as a super-Earth because of its size: The world is about twice the width of Earth and is super-dense, with about eight times the mass of Earth. But until now, scientists have never managed to detect the infrared light from the super-Earth world. Spitzer first detected infrared light from an alien planet in 2005.

Spitzer Finds Galaxy with Split Personality

While some galaxies are rotund and others are slender disks like our spiral Milky Way, new observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope show that the Sombrero galaxy is both. The galaxy, which is a round elliptical galaxy with a thin disk embedded inside, is one of the first known to exhibit characteristics of the two different types. As said Dimitri Gadotti of the European Southern Observatory in Chile the Sombrero is more complex than previously thought.

Oldest and Closest White Dwarfs

Scientists from the University of Oklahoma have identified two white dwarf stars considered the oldest and closest known to man. Astronomers identified these 11- to 12-billion-year-old white dwarf stars only 100 light-years away from Earth. According to scientists these stars are the closest known examples of the oldest stars in the universe forming soon after the Big Bang. Mukremin Kilic, assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the OU College of Arts and Sciences and lead author on a recently published paper said that a white dwarf is like a hot stove, once the stove is off, it cools slowly over time.

Supernova Explosion Turned Left Over Stellar Corpse Inside Out

According to scientists massive supernova explosion that destroyed a faraway star apparently turned the left over stellar corpse inside out as well. Using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory spacecraft, a team of researchers mapped the distribution of elements in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A for short) in unprecedented detail. They found that Cas A, which is located about 11,000 light-years from Earth and exploded 300 years ago from our perspective, is wearing its guts on the outside.

Citizen Scientists Discovered More than 5000 Bubbles in Milky Way

A team of volunteers has pored over observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and discovered more than 5,000 bubbles in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy. Young, hot stars blow these bubbles into surrounding gas and dust, indicating areas of brand new star formation. Upwards of 35,000 citizen scientists sifted through the Spitzer infrared data as part of the online Milky Way Project to find these telltale bubbles. The volunteers have turned up 10 times as many bubbles as previous surveys so far.

One of the Biggest Flare of the Solar Cycle

With the help of data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) NASA models have now provided more information about the two CMEs associated with the two March 6 flares. The first is traveling faster than 1300 miles per second, the second more than 1100 miles per second. NASA’s models predict that the CMEs will impact both Earth and Mars, as well as pass by several NASA spacecraft, Messenger, Spitzer, and STEREO-B. The models also predict that the leading edge of the first CME will reach Earth at about 1:25 AM EST on the morning of March 8 (plus or minus 7 hours).

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