The Mysteries of Sirius

Since ancient times and across multiple civilizations, Sirius located in the constellation CanisMajor – also known as the Big Dog, has been surrounded with a mysterious lore. Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky, because of both its intrinsic luminosity and its proximity to Earth at a distance of 8.5 light year. The name “Sirius” is derived from the Ancient Greek: Σείριος Seirios (“glowing” or “scorcher”). Artifacts of ancient civilizations have revealed that Sirius was of a great importance in astronomy, mythology and occultism. Mystery schools consider it to be “sun behind the sun” and, therefore, the true source of our sun’s potency.

View More The Mysteries of Sirius
Impossible planets

Kepler space telescope discovered impossible planets in a cluster of stars

The American scientists analyzed the data collected by a Kepler space telescope in scattered cluster of stars on a joint of constellations of the Swan and Lira. In one of them the scientists found two small impossible planets. Earlier the existence of these plants was considered as the impossible. Soren Meibom (from the Harvard-Smithsonian center of astrophysics in Cambridge) and his colleagues analyzed the data collected by a Kepler space telescope at supervision over cluster of stars in constellations of the Swan and Lira. In total scientists tracked fluctuations in brightness of 377 stars. In the scattered congestion NGC 6811 in Swan constellation which is removed from on 3 thousand light years, they found two impossible planets which brightness periodically went down. Scientists tracked its changes and came to a conclusion that blinking of these stars arose because on their disk passed rather small giant planets of Kepler-66b and Kepler-67b, whose radius were more than terrestrial everything by 2,8-2,9 times.

View More Kepler space telescope discovered impossible planets in a cluster of stars
Galaxy NGC660

Unusual Galaxy Photographed from Gemini Observatory

Astronomers from Observatory “Gemini” received the most detailed to date image of the unusual galaxy NGC 660, relating to a rare class of polar galaxies. The galaxy NGC 660 is located at a distance of 40 million light years from Earth near the constellation Pisces. It is as if two separate star clusters: the spiral and lenticular. Such galaxies are called polar – they rotate the outer ring over the poles of the internal cluster. In addition, NGC 660 is the only other known polar galaxies in which the center has an old lenticular congestion. All polar galaxies are a result of the interaction of two separate star clusters. Some of them can be formed by the collision of two galaxies formed (for example, a galaxy can be formed by a merger in the future, with the Milky Way Andromeda).

View More Unusual Galaxy Photographed from Gemini Observatory

Dark Matter Theories Challenged By Galaxy Structures

According to astronomers at the University of Bonn in Germany, who made the discovery, the structure of satellite galaxies and star clusters around the Milky Way is so vast that it reaches across a million light-years 10 times as wide as the Milky Way itself. Existing dark matter theories fail to explain the arrangement of these cosmic objects. As said study team member Pavel Kroupa, a professor of astronomy at the University of Bon their model appears to rule out the presence of dark matter in the universe, threatening a central pillar of current cosmological theory.

View More Dark Matter Theories Challenged By Galaxy Structures

Stellar Grouping NGC 2040

These bright stars shining through what looks like a haze in the night sky are part of a young stellar grouping in one of the largest known star formation regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a dwarf satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.The LMC is the third closest galaxy to our Milky Way. It is located some 160 000 light-years away, and is about 100 times smaller than our own. The image was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

View More Stellar Grouping NGC 2040

Rogue Alien Planets

According to study many wandering alien worlds, which were ejected from the solar systems in which they formed, likely find new homes with different suns. The finding could explain why some alien planets orbit extremely far from their stars.Study lead author Hagai Perets, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and co-author Thijs Kouwenhoven of China’s Peking University simulated the evolution of young star clusters containing about as many free-floating planets as stars.

View More Rogue Alien Planets

Hubble Space Telescope Shows Heart of Tarantula Nebula

New photo from the Hubble Space Telescope has captured an unprecedented panoramic view of the Tarantula nebula, revealing its bright heart of massive stars. The photo is actually a colossal mosaic, one of the largest ever built from Hubble images, and shows an intense star-forming hotspot called 30 Doradus. Hubble’s science team unveiled this new image on April 17. Hubble’s new view of the region inside the Tarantula nebula shows massive stars’ winds carving cavities into gas clouds, creating a fantasy landscape of pillars, ridges and valleys.

View More Hubble Space Telescope Shows Heart of Tarantula Nebula

Comet Garradd Sails Slowly Past Globular Star Cluster M92

Skywatcher Bill Snyder took this marvelous photo on February 3, 2012 from Heavens Mirror Observatory in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Comet Garradd sails slowly past globular star cluster Messier 92 (also known as M92 or NGC 6341) in this stunning image. The comet approached Messier 92 (M92) as it flew over the Hercules constellation. It passed within half a degree of Messier 92 (M92) on the day the image was taken.

View More Comet Garradd Sails Slowly Past Globular Star Cluster M92

RXCaptures Thermonuclear Behavior of Unique Neutron Star

In October 2010, a neutron star near the center of our galaxy erupted with hundreds of X-ray bursts that were powered by a barrage of thermonuclear explosions on the star’s surface. On October 10, 2010, the European Space Agency’s INTEGRAL satellite detected a transient X-ray source in the direction of Terzan 5, a globular star cluster about 25,000 light-years away toward the constellation Sagittarius. The object, dubbed IGR J17480–2446, is classed as a low-mass X-ray binary system, in which the neutron star orbits a star much like the sun and draws a stream of matter from it.

View More RXCaptures Thermonuclear Behavior of Unique Neutron Star