Samsung Galaxy S III replaces TV remote,hotel check-in, keycard and AC control

Samsung Electronics announced an hotel hospitality solution for the new Holiday Inn London Stratford City, situated next to the Olympic Park. Samsung has partnered with Fingi Inc., a Samsung Enterprise Alliance Program partner, to enable Holiday Inn London Stratford City to offer residents’ a full suite of hotel services, remote control of room settings and a special Samsung & Holiday Inn ‘Olympic Newsletter’ with the latest updates from London 2012 – all on the new GALAXY S III Smartphone. Holiday Inn, owned by InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG), is the Official Hotel Services Provider to the London 2012 Olympics.The joint solution combines the GALAXY S III with a fully customizable app to provide a complete connectivity and room control solution. The mobile solution provides a flexible, scalable and easy-to-install solution through a downloadable Holiday Inn for Android app.

WISE Finds Brown Dwarfs Close To Solar System

NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, has been turning up a new crowd of stars close to solar system, the coldest of the brown dwarf family of failed stars. As said Davy Kirkpatrick of the WISE science team at NASA’s Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena this is a really illuminating result. Now that they are finally seeing the solar neighborhood with keener, infrared vision, the little guys aren’t as prevalent as they once thought.

Rare Transit of Venus

The transit of Venus across the sun is one of the rarest celestial sights visible from Earth, one that wowed scientists and amateur observers around the world Tuesday (June 5). The event, arguably the most anticipated skywatching display of the year, marked the last time Venus will cross the sun (as seen from Earth) for 105 years. Venus transits occur when Venus reaches a point in its orbit that brings the planet directly between the Earth and the sun.

Hubble May See Transit of Earth in 2014

Venus will pass in front of the sun from Earth’s perspective on Tuesday (June 5; Wednesday, June 6, in much of the Eastern Hemisphere), marking the last such Venus transit until 2117. However, there’s a chance to observe an Earth transit less than two years from now using a little creative thinking, some researchers note. In January 2014, Jupiter will witness a transit of Earth. And we can see it too, the astronomers say, by training NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope on the huge planet and studying the sunlight it reflects.

Transit of Venus 2012

On June 5th, 2012, Venus will pass across the face of the sun, producing a silhouette that no one alive today will likely see again. Transits of Venus are very rare, coming in pairs separated by more than a hundred years. This June’s transit, the bookend of a 2004-2012 pair, won’t be repeated until the year 2117. Fortunately, the event is widely visible. Observers on seven continents, even a sliver of Antarctica, will be in position to see it.

Annular Solar Eclipse 2012

A so-called annular solar eclipse, which took place on May 20, was seen across the globe from late afternoon to early evening, beginning in East Asia and traveling across to the western United States. In an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely block the sun, but leaves a fiery ring around its circumference. Observers along a narrow path were well placed to see the full annular solar eclipse, but skywatchers elsewhere (with the exception of the U.S. East Coast) caught a stunning partial eclipse.

Superflares of Sun-Like Stars

Astronomers have previously detected superflares from a variety of star types, which release bursts that have 10 to 10,000 times more energy than the largest solar flare ever detected from our sun. Scientists wanted to know how common these outbursts might be from stars like the sun, those with masses and temperatures similar to our star. Even normal solar flares can damage satellites, endanger astronauts and wreak havoc on electrical grids on Earth, suggesting that superflares might be catastrophic to life on Earth.

Ring of Fire Solar Eclipse

On May 20 a solar eclipse will block out most of the sun, leaving a spectacular “ring of fire” shining in the sky for observers located along the eclipse’s path. The event is what’s known as an annular solar eclipse, from the Latin “annulus,” meaning “little ring”, and its full glory should be visible from much of Asia, the Pacific region and some of western North America, weather permitting. At its peak, the eclipse will block about 94 percent of the sun’s light.

Asteroid 2012 JU Zips Close By Earth

An asteroid with the size of a school bus gave Earth a close shave on May 13, passing well inside the orbit of the moon. According to NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif the near-Earth asteroid 2012 JU, which is thought to be about 40 feet (12 meters) wide, came within 119,000 miles (191,500 kilometers) or so of our planet before zooming off into deep space.

Posts navigation