Chandra space telescope opens the secrets of the black holes in the Andromeda galaxy

The large Andromeda galaxy opens many secrets thanks to Chandra space telescope. With help of supersensitive scientific tools of a Chandra space telescope scientists managed to find a large number of candidates for the black holes in a large Andromeda galaxy. The Andromeda galaxy is the neighbor of our Galaxy. Discovery was made with help of 150 supervisions over Andromeda’s galaxy by means of Chandra space telescopes. Supervision was made within 13 years. During this time scientists found 26 candidates for black holes. Today it is a record by quantity of the black holes located in another, than our Galaxy. Some astronomers consider a galaxy Andromeda as the sister of our own galaxy and are sure that through some billions years both of these galaxies will surely face.

The NuSTAR telescope from Chandra xray Observatory found a black hole

The black hole in one of galaxies in constellation of the Sculptor which earlier actively absorbed interstellar gas, stopped now activity and fell into a sleep. This sleep is lasting about ten years. The information obtained by astronomers with help of a NuSTAR telescope from Chandra xray Observatory. The “fallen asleep” black hole weighing about 5 million masses of the Sun is in the center of an active galaxy of NGC 253. In this star system located in 8 million light years from Earth, processes of formation of new stars go with very high speed. The last observations from Chandra xray observatory showed that the black hole actively absorbs gas. According to the astronomers the results testify that the black hole fell asleep over the last ten years. Periodic supervision with help of Chandra xray observatory and NuSTAR the scientists will be able to tell, whether it woke up again. Scientists note that black holes in the centers of galaxies stop absorbing a matter and fall into hibernation only when in their vicinities are settled “food” stocks.

ALMA Radio Telescope – The Most Professional Telescope of the World

The most powerful radio telescope of the world will pull back the curtain on the planet obscuring birth. During last two years, the scientists added some antennas and resolution to the Atacama Large Millimater Array (ALMA). The ALMA radio telescope will start its operation in the next week. Last year the AlMA measured the orbits, which moves around the star, and found that the orbits has less dimensions, than the scientists thought. There is two methods for telescopes to find a new exoplanets: one- the gravitational wobble, second- changes of brightness during the passing directly in front of its star. ALMA radio telescope will announce the converting of cold gas into clouds in the protostars. The secret of 1,3 billion facility’s solution are height and distance. Facilities of ALMA sit on a 5000 meter high above the sea. The astronomers, working in ALMA facility at 2900 meters, will use oxygen. The ALMA system include approximately 50 antennas. The system of operating is following: the antennas snag an astronomical signals from the sky, combine all the results in the computer, for getting final information regarding the place, form where they snag the signal.This system allows ALMA not only to observe the young planets, but also pin down life – building block in gas clouds.

WISE Mission has Revealed More than 200 Blazars

With the help the data collected by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) astronomers are actively hunting a class of supermassive black holes throughout the universe called blazars. The mission has revealed more than 200 blazars.Blazars are among the most energetic objects in the universe. They consist of supermassive black holes actively “feeding,” or pulling matter onto them, at the cores of giant galaxies.

Astronomers Map Distribution of Dark Matter in Abell 383

Two teams of astronomers have used data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes to map the distribution of dark matter in a galaxy cluster known as Abell 383.Abell 383 is located about 2.3 billion light years from Earth. Researchers also able to determine how the dark matter is distributed along the line of sight. The recent work on Abell 383 provides one of the most detailed 3-D pictures yet taken of dark matter in a galaxy cluster. The X-ray data (purple) from Chandra in the composite image show the hot gas, which is by far the dominant type of normal matter in the cluster.

Milky Way Galaxy May be Teeming With Homeless Planets

According to researchers the nomad planets could be surprisingly common in our bustling galaxy. The study predicts that there may be 100,000 times more of these wandering, homeless planets than stars in the Milky Way. If this is the case, these intriguing cosmic bodies would belong to a whole new class of alien worlds, shaking up existing theories of planet formation. These free-flying planets may also raise new and tantalizing questions in the search for life beyond Earth.According to researchers and while nomad planets cannot benefit from the heat given off from their parent stars, these worlds could generate heat from tectonic activity or internal radioactive decay.

Rare Black Hole May Survive Galaxy Destruction

The Hubble Space Telescope recently spied a cluster of young blue stars surrounding a rare mid-weight black hole that suggests the black hole was once at the center of a dwarf galaxy. Astronomers think this galaxy was torn apart by the gravity of a larger host galaxy that it orbited. The violent encounter would have stripped away most of the dwarf galaxy’s stars, but it also could have compressed the gas around its central black hole, triggering a new wave of star formation. It is these new stars that Hubble recently saw signs of. The observations suggest that the young stars must be less than 200 million years old, meaning the collision between the parent galaxy and its dwarf likely occurred around that time.

NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer Mission Comes to the End

NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer, or Galex, was placed in standby mode as engineers prepare to end mission operations, nearly nine years after the telescope’s launch. The spacecraft is scheduled to be decommissioned. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer was launched on April 28, 2003. Its mission is to study the shape, brightness, size and distance of galaxies across 10 billion years of cosmic history. The 50 centimeter diameter (19.7-inch) telescope onboard the Galaxy Evolution Explorer sweeps the skies in search of ultraviolet-light sources.

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