Moons of Uranus: Interesting Facts for Those who are Interested in Space

This article is for those who have a keen interest in Space Science. We will provide you some interesting and useful knowledge or better to say worthwhile information which can enrich your background. Now let’s focus on our main topic: Moons of Uranus. The planet Uranus is the seventh planet of the Solar System which has 27 known moons, that most of them were not discovered until the space age. And all of them are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. Moons range from Titania, 981 miles (1,579 kilometers) in diameter, to tiny Cupid, only 11 miles (18 km) in diameter. Uranus moons are divided into three groups: thirteen inner moons, five major moons, and nine irregular moons. The inner moons are small dark bodies that share common properties and origins with Uranus’s rings. The five major moons are massive enough to have reached hydrostatic equilibrium, and four of them show signs of internally driven processes such as canyon formation and volcanism on their surfaces.
“Sweet Moon,” William Shakespeare wrote in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “I thank thee for thy sunny beams; I thank thee, Moon, for shining now so bright.” A few centuries ago honor with famous playwright the moons of Uranus named after the characters from the works of Shakespeare.

Hubble Space Telescope Captures Auroras on Uranus

The Uranus aurora photos were captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, marking the first time the icy blue planet’s light show has been seen by an observatory near Earth. Until now, the only views of auroras on Uranus were from the NASA Voyager probe that zipped by the planet in 1986. Hubble recorded auroras on the day side of Uranus only twice, both times in 2011, while the planet was 2.5 billion miles (4 billion kilometers) from Earth.

Pluto May Have Rings

Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune all have rings, leaving Pluto as the only outer planet without rings. But PSI Senior Scientist Henry Throop would love to change that. Using both giant telescopes on Earth, and a small spacecraft currently on its way to Pluto, Throop is searching for signs that Pluto may have rings orbiting it, just like its neighbors. Astronomers expect that Pluto could well have rings, they’ve just never been discovered. Until now astronomers haven’t found any rings. Throop is working with NASA’s New Horizons mission, which is sending a spacecraft to Pluto, to arrive in 2015.