Lyman Alpha Mapping Project

LAMP Reveals Lunar Surface Features

New maps produced by the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal features at the Moon’s northern and southern poles in regions that lie in perpetual darkness. LAMP, developed by Southwest Research Institute, uses a novel method to peer into these so-called permanently shadowed regions (PSRs), making visible the invisible. The LAMP maps show that many PSRs are darker at far-ultraviolet wavelengths and redder than nearby surface areas that receive sunlight. The darker regions are consistent with large surface porosities, indicating “fluffy” soils, while the reddening is consistent with the presence of water frost on the surface.

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The Water of Lunar Magma

NASAs researchers has measured for the first time water from the moon in the form of tiny globules of molten rock which have turned to glass like material trapped within crystals This measurements show that the water content of lunar magma is 100 times higher than previous studies suggested. Water contents ranging from 615 to 1410 parts per million

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